Senate Roll Call Vote 122 on S.627 Budget Control Act of 2011, Cloture Motion Rejected

Telegraph by Constantino Brumidi

U.S. Senate Roll Call Votes 112th Congress – 1st Session

as compiled through Senate LIS by the Senate Bill Clerk under the direction of the Secretary of the Senate

Vote Summary

Question: On the Cloture Motion (Motion to Invoke Cloture on the Motion to Concur in the House Amendment to S. 627, with Amdt. No. 589 )
Vote Number: 122 Vote Date: July 31, 2011, 01:01 PM
Required For Majority: 3/5 Vote Result: Cloture Motion Rejected
Measure Number: S. 627 (Faster FOIA Act of 2011 )
Measure Title: A bill to establish the Commission on Freedom of Information Act Processing Delays.
Vote Counts: YEAs 50
NAYs 49
Not Voting 1
Vote Summary By Senator Name By Vote Position By Home State

S.627 Latest Title: Budget Control Act of 2011, Bill Summary & Status

S.627
Latest Title: Budget Control Act of 2011
Sponsor: Sen Leahy, Patrick J. [VT] (introduced 3/17/2011)      Cosponsors (3)
Related Bills: H.RES.375H.RES.383H.R.1564
Latest Major Action: 7/29/2011 Passed/agreed to in House. Status: On passage Passed by recorded vote: 218 – 210 (Roll no. 677).
Latest Action: 7/29/2011 Motion by Senator Reid to refer to Senate Committee on the Budget the House message to accompany the bill (S. 627) to report back forthwith with amendment SA 591 made in Senate.
Note: The bill is the House vehicle to raise the debt ceiling, make budget deficit reductions, and require a balanced budget amendment to the Constitution.


All Information (except text) Text of Legislation CRS Summary Major Congressional Actions

All Congressional Actions

All Congressional Actions with Amendments
With links to Congressional Record pages, votes,reports

Titles Cosponsors (3) Committees
Related Bills Amendments Related Committee Documents
CBO Cost Estimates Subjects

Mack: “Stopping Runaway Spending Must Be First Priority”

Mack Votes ‘No’ on House Plan Due to Raise Debt Ceiling, But Commends House on Passing Their Second Plan to Fix Mounting Crisis

WASHINGTON – Congressman Connie Mack (FL-14) opposed the plan to raise the debt ceiling voted on in the House late today.

Mack stated: “The Congress must stop giving President Obama more and more money to fund the endless list of programs Americans do not want, like ObamaCarem Amtrak, and the NEA.  While I did not support the plan put forth today, the House has put forth two plans and the President has failed to put any plan on the table.  Prioritization of which federal bills get paid starting Tuesday falls on the President’s shoulders and the scare tactics he has invoked on our nation’s seniors and military is appalling.

“As a permanent fix, I would urge the Speaker and the President to adopt the Mack Penny Plan which puts forth a plan to balance the budget and takes us out of debt in eight years.”

Presently the Mack Penny Plan enjoys the support of over 45 co-sponsors in the U.S House; the backing of the Republican Study Committee’s 103 Members, U.S. Senators Enzi (R-WY), Rand Paul (R-KY), John Barrasso (R-WY),The One Cent Solution, The National Taxpayers Union, and FreedomWorks.   The Plan has received a large push recently from conservative talk show host Sean Hannity.

The Penny Plan balances the budget by:

· Cutting total federal spending by one percent each year for six consecutive years,

· Setting an overall spending cap of 18 percent of gross domestic product in 2018, and

· Reducing overall spending by $7.5 trillion over 10 years.

Latham Statement On His ‘No’ Vote Against Debt Ceiling Measure

Iowa Congressman Tom Latham released the following statement on Friday after voting against S. 627 in the U.S. House of Representatives:

“Throughout this year, the national discussion has been dominated by the need to change Washington’s spending ways.  I, as many Americans do, fear that this talk is truly just talk.  A good case in point is President Obama’s 2012 budget.  When he introduced this budget he used these strong words, “We simply cannot continue to spend as if deficits don’t have consequences; as if waste doesn’t matter; as if the hard-earned tax dollars of the American people can be treated like Monopoly money; as if we can ignore this challenge for another generation.  We can’t.”  But a review of the President’s budget shows that his words are nothing more than just talk about changing the culture of spending because that budget adds an additional $9.5 trillion dollars to our debt.

“I have been very clear in our debate about spending that I will only support measures that meet the criteria of immediately cutting wasteful spending, imposing spending caps as a percentage of our economy going forward, and requiring a balanced budget amendment.  We simply can’t keep giving Washington permission in the form of a blank check to continue to spend beyond its means.

“As neither the President nor the Senate have yet to offer one specific proposal, I applaud the House Republican leadership for taking the initiative on the national debt limit and spending restraint debate by actually offering real proposals, discussions and votes in an effort to move this process forward and meet the President’s declared default deadline of August 2nd.

“Unfortunately, while this measure heads in the right direction, it falls short of the criteria I feel must be met in order to gain my support and vote.

“This bill gives the government permission to continue the destructive spending and borrowing policies that have created waves of uncertainty throughout our economy without the real guarantees we need to force Washington to do as Iowa families, farmers and small businesses do – live and spend within its means.

“I share the growing frustration and anger the American people have over this debate and fractured process.  And I continue to pledge to work with any members of the House or Senate who are willing to join me to move our country forward with a solution that gives the American people the peace of mind of a common-sense, enforceable solution.  This is our responsibility as elected leaders to do nothing short of putting this nation on the path towards fiscal sanity and responsibility without risking default on our debt and other obligations.”

King Votes Against Boehner’s Debt Limit Bill

Washington D.C.- Congressman Steve King (R-IA) released the following statement after voting against legislation introduced by House Speaker John Boehner, S. 627, that provides for an increase in the nation’s debt limit.

“I voted for and supported the debt ceiling increase coupled with Cut, Cap and Balance which included a smart, visionary, balanced budget amendment to our Constitution that caps spending at 18% of GDP,” said King. “That was the place to take a stand.”

“I voted against S. 627 because it weakens our position and makes it harder to realize the discipline necessary to significantly reduce our deficit and ultimately pay down our national debt.”

Jordan Statement on Passage of Budget Control Act

Washington, Jul 29 – Congressman Jim Jordan (R-Urbana) released the following statement in regards to his decision to vote against the Budget Control Act of 2011:

“Just a few weeks ago, the Balanced Budget Amendment wasn’t even a part of the conversation, despite the overwhelming support it has among the American public. Thanks to the efforts of a dedicated group of conservatives, it is now an integral part of the debate over how to solve America’s spending problem.”

“The growing momentum toward requiring Washington to actually balance its budget shows that House Republicans have connected with the American people. Leading Democrats are another story. Senator Reid and President Obama are still trying to fool the American people into thinking we can keep borrowing and spending like there is no tomorrow.”

“I sincerely appreciate Speaker Boehner’s tireless work to achieve real spending cuts without tax increases, and I know there will be good conservatives on both sides of this vote.”

“If this bill becomes law, rest assured that Americans will insist that the promise of sending a Balanced Budget Amendment to the states be kept. Unfortunately, Senator Reid plans to strip out the Balanced Budget Amendment requirement or let this bill die altogether. If he does so, let’s remember that a bipartisan group of 234 House members already passed a responsible Cut, Cap, and Balance compromise plan to protect our AAA credit rating and solve the country’s debt problems.”

Rep. Johnson Statement on Boehner Plan

Rep. Johnson Statement on Boehner Plan
07/29/11

Washington, D.C. – U.S. Rep. Timothy V. Johnson issued the following statement today after voting in opposition to the debt reduction plan put forward by House Speaker John Boehner.

“I have the greatest respect for Speaker Boehner. I believe he was the only person in leadership to act in good faith in these negotiations. I supported his Cut, Cap and Balance proposal a week ago and sincerely believed that was a way forward.

“This latest proposal, however, is a shadow of that effort. It promises cuts in the years ahead but as any of us who have any experience in the process knows, there are no guarantees that those cuts will actually occur.

“Our country is in crisis and there are many who have urged us to compromise. But compromise requires cooperation and there has been none from the other side. This plan offers no concrete plan to reform entitlements, and perhaps most importantly, continues to protect our bloated defense spending, including funding of an illegal incursion into Libya.

“I have been part of bipartisan efforts to withdraw from Afghanistan for over two years now. I have challenged the legality of what is an unconstitutional attack on Libya.

“We have spent, according to the White House, $1.3 trillion on conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan since 2001. I believe the real cost is much higher. The Brown University Watson Institute for International Studies last month put the real cost at between $3.7 and $4.4 trillion when interest costs and long-term obligations to veterans are included. Real cuts there and across the board are not only possible but necessary.

“Real entitlement reform is possible and necessary.

“I cannot support any measure that does not seriously address Washington, D.C.’s profligate waste of hard-earned taxpayer dollars. This position arises not from any political motivation, but from my conscience and the knowledge of how wastefully this government spends our money. My position against debt limit increases and budgets under both Republican and Democratic administrations has been consistent and unwavering. Abdicating those principles now would be hypocritical.”

Graves On Debt Limit Vote: The Policy Doesn’t Match The Size Of The Problem

Washington, D.C., Jul 29 -

U.S. Rep. Tom Graves (R-GA-09) issued the following statement after voting against S. 627 (as amended), a bill to raise the debt ceiling:

“As always, I cast this vote based on my conscience, constituents, and country.   It’s long past time to fundamentally change Washington and reform our federal government into a responsible servant of the taxpayers.  My neighbors in North Georgia overwhelmingly agree, and in keeping the promises of my campaign and the mission given to me as their representative, I cannot approve of a debt limit increase without a sincere solution for our spending-driven debt crisis.

“Despite the Speaker’s hard work and good intentions, it’s clear to me that the policy before the House today does not match the size of the problem we face.  This bill immediately gives President Obama a $900 billion increase in the debt ceiling, but only provides $7 billion in savings for the American people next year.  The addition of a balanced budget amendment is a welcome change, but it is triggered only after the debt limit is increased.  America needs a plan for long-term success, not a compromise for short-term comfort.

“I continue to stand by the Cut, Cap, and Balance approach because it remains the only available option that ends the debt crisis and preserves America’s credit rating.  Most importantly, this approach is designed to take power from the government and give it back to the American people.  It’s time to learn from the failed compromises of the past.  It’s time to pass a policy that marginalizes the federal government so the private sector can expand and create the jobs our country desperately needs.”

HR 2693: Reid Vehicle Fails in House Roll Call Vote 682

07/30/11 03:12 PM ET

The House on Saturday afternoon rejected a debt-ceiling plan from Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) after a contentious debate in which Democrats accused Republicans of setting up the bill to fail.

The House voted 173-246 on the bill, short of a majority and well short of the two-thirds majority needed for passage, which was required because Republicans brought up the bill under a suspension of House rules. Every Republican voted no, along with 11 Democrats.

After the Democrat controlled Senate killed the House Budget Control Act of 2011 the House killed the Senate version offered by Harry Reid.

Final Vote Results For Roll Call 682

(Republicans in roman; Democrats in italic; Independents underlined)
H R 2693 2/3 RECORDED VOTE 30-Jul-2011 3:13 PM
QUESTION: On Motion to Suspend the Rules and Pass, as Amended
BILL TITLE: To cut spending, maintain existing commitments, and for other purposes

Ayes Noes PRES NV
Republican 235 4
Democratic 173 11 9
Independent
TOTALS 173 246 13

—- AYES 173 —

Altmire
Andrews
Baldwin
Bass (CA)
Becerra
Berkley
Berman
Bishop (GA)
Bishop (NY)
Blumenauer
Boswell
Brady (PA)
Brown (FL)
Butterfield
Capps
Capuano
Cardoza
Carnahan
Carney
Carson (IN)
Castor (FL)
Chandler
Cicilline
Clarke (MI)
Clarke (NY)
Cleaver
Clyburn
Cohen
Connolly (VA)
Conyers
Cooper
Costa
Costello
Courtney
Critz
Crowley
Cuellar
Cummings
Davis (CA)
Davis (IL)
DeFazio
DeGette
DeLauro
Deutch
Dicks
Dingell
Doggett
Donnelly (IN)
Doyle
Edwards
Ellison
Engel
Eshoo
Farr
Fattah
Filner
Frank (MA)
Fudge
Garamendi
Gonzalez
Green, Al
Green, Gene
Grijalva
Gutierrez
Hahn
Hanabusa
Hastings (FL)
Heinrich
Higgins
Himes
Hinojosa
Hirono
Hochul
Holden
Holt
Honda
Hoyer
Inslee
Israel
Jackson (IL)
Jackson Lee (TX)
Johnson (GA)
Johnson, E. B.
Kaptur
Keating
Kildee
Kind
Kissell
Kucinich
Langevin
Larsen (WA)
Larson (CT)
Lee (CA)
Levin
Lewis (GA)
Lipinski
Lowey
Luján
Lynch
Markey
Matsui
McCarthy (NY)
McCollum
McDermott
McGovern
McNerney
Meeks
Michaud
Miller (NC)
Miller, George
Moore
Moran
Murphy (CT)
Nadler
Napolitano
Neal
Olver
Owens
Pallone
Pascrell
Pastor (AZ)
Payne
Pelosi
Perlmutter
Peters
Pingree (ME)
Polis
Price (NC)
Quigley
Rahall
Rangel
Reyes
Richardson
Richmond
Rothman (NJ)
Roybal-Allard
Ruppersberger
Rush
Ryan (OH)
Sánchez, Linda T.
Sanchez, Loretta
Sarbanes
Schakowsky
Schiff
Schwartz
Scott (VA)
Scott, David
Serrano
Sewell
Sherman
Shuler
Sires
Slaughter
Smith (WA)
Stark
Sutton
Thompson (CA)
Thompson (MS)
Tierney
Tonko
Towns
Tsongas
Van Hollen
Velázquez
Walz (MN)
Wasserman Schultz
Waters
Watt
Waxman
Welch
Wilson (FL)
Woolsey
Yarmuth

—- NOES 246 —

Adams
Aderholt
Akin
Alexander
Amash
Austria
Bachmann
Bachus
Barletta
Barrow
Bartlett
Barton (TX)
Bass (NH)
Benishek
Berg
Biggert
Bilbray
Bilirakis
Black
Blackburn
Bonner
Bono Mack
Boren
Boustany
Brady (TX)
Braley (IA)
Broun (GA)
Buchanan
Bucshon
Buerkle
Burgess
Burton (IN)
Calvert
Camp
Campbell
Canseco
Cantor
Capito
Carter
Cassidy
Chabot
Chaffetz
Coble
Coffman (CO)
Cole
Conaway
Cravaack
Crawford
Crenshaw
Culberson
Davis (KY)
Denham
Dent
DesJarlais
Diaz-Balart
Dold
Dreier
Duffy
Duncan (SC)
Duncan (TN)
Ellmers
Emerson
Farenthold
Fincher
Fitzpatrick
Flake
Fleischmann
Fleming
Flores
Forbes
Fortenberry
Foxx
Franks (AZ)
Frelinghuysen
Gardner
Garrett
Gerlach
Gibbs
Gibson
Gingrey (GA)
Gohmert
Goodlatte
Gosar
Gowdy
Granger
Graves (GA)
Graves (MO)
Griffin (AR)
Griffith (VA)
Grimm
Guinta
Guthrie
Hall
Hanna
Harper
Harris
Hartzler
Hastings (WA)
Hayworth
Heck
Hensarling
Herger
Herrera Beutler
Huelskamp
Huizenga (MI)
Hultgren
Hunter
Hurt
Issa
Jenkins
Johnson (IL)
Johnson (OH)
Johnson, Sam
Jones
Jordan
Kelly
King (IA)
King (NY)
Kingston
Kinzinger (IL)
Kline
Labrador
Lamborn
Lance
Landry
Lankford
Latham
LaTourette
Latta
Lewis (CA)
LoBiondo
Loebsack
Long
Lucas
Luetkemeyer
Lummis
Lungren, Daniel E.
Mack
Manzullo
Marchant
Marino
Matheson
McCarthy (CA)
McCaul
McClintock
McCotter
McHenry
McIntyre
McKeon
McKinley
McMorris Rodgers
Meehan
Mica
Miller (FL)
Miller (MI)
Miller, Gary
Mulvaney
Murphy (PA)
Myrick
Neugebauer
Noem
Nugent
Nunes
Nunnelee
Olson
Palazzo
Paul
Paulsen
Pearce
Pence
Peterson
Petri
Pitts
Platts
Poe (TX)
Pompeo
Posey
Price (GA)
Quayle
Rehberg
Reichert
Renacci
Ribble
Rigell
Rivera
Roby
Roe (TN)
Rogers (AL)
Rogers (KY)
Rogers (MI)
Rohrabacher
Rokita
Rooney
Ros-Lehtinen
Roskam
Ross (AR)
Ross (FL)
Royce
Runyan
Ryan (WI)
Scalise
Schilling
Schmidt
Schock
Schrader
Schweikert
Scott (SC)
Scott, Austin
Sensenbrenner
Sessions
Shimkus
Shuster
Simpson
Smith (NE)
Smith (NJ)
Smith (TX)
Southerland
Stearns
Stivers
Stutzman
Sullivan
Terry
Thompson (PA)
Thornberry
Tiberi
Tipton
Turner
Upton
Visclosky
Walberg
Walden
Walsh (IL)
Webster
West
Westmoreland
Whitfield
Wilson (SC)
Wittman
Wolf
Womack
Woodall
Wu
Yoder
Young (AK)
Young (FL)
Young (IN)

—- NOT VOTING 13 —

Ackerman
Baca
Bishop (UT)
Brooks
Chu
Clay
Gallegly
Giffords
Hinchey
Lofgren, Zoe
Maloney
Reed
Speier

Senate Roll Call Vote 120 Rejecting House Budget Control Act of 2011

“This House has acted,” said Boehner. “And it is time for the administration, and time for our colleagues across the aisle, put something on the table! Tell us where you are! [Cheers and applause]

Boehner had scheduled a vote on his bill Thursday, but he had to pull it from the floor after failing to convince enough Tea Party members of his caucus to support it. To avert a potential political disaster, Boehner added a provision which would force both houses of Congress to pass a balanced budget amendment before the debt ceiling is raised again early next year- something analysts say is very unlikely to happen.

But just two hours after the House vote, Senate Majority leader Harry Reid moved to hold a vote to kill the House bill, and it passed with 59 Senators voting for it and 41 voting against it. Senator Reid is pushing the Senate to pass his own separate version of a bill that would cut spending and raise the debt ceiling until after the 2012 elections.

Like all other proposals to resolve America’s debt and spending problems no serious proposals have been offered in this blog’s opinion. The Democrat controlled Senate roll call vote to table the House Budget Control Act of 2011 is presented below with helpful links.

U.S. Senate Roll Call Votes 112th Congress – 1st Session

as compiled through Senate LIS by the Senate Bill Clerk under the direction of the Secretary of the Senate

Vote Summary

Question: On the Motion to Table (Motion to Table the Motion to Concur in the House Amendment to S. 627 )
Vote Number: 120 Vote Date: July 29, 2011, 08:00 PM
Required For Majority: 1/2 Vote Result: Motion to Table Agreed to
Measure Number: S. 627 (Faster FOIA Act of 2011 )
Measure Title: A bill to establish the Commission on Freedom of Information Act Processing Delays.
Vote Counts: YEAs 59
NAYs 41
Vote Summary By Senator Name By Vote Position By Home State

Stanford Matthews on the Debt Deals in Washington

graft, corruptionThe battle goes on in Washington over fiscal issues and the economic survival of our nation. While House and Senate leadership look for deals on the debt others have taken a principled stand to do the right thing.

Some statements from the 22 Republicans who voted against one such deal, the Budget Control Act of 2011, are presented in the last eight posts along with the roll call vote on this legislative fiasco. Others will be presented in subsequent posts.

Speaker Boehner has been negotiating with just about everyone in Washington to produce legislation that can survive votes in both chambers and be signed by an out of touch president. It is an effort doomed from the beginning since liberals and RINOs are content to keep borrowing and spending until our nation collapses under the crushing burden of debt no country can sustain.

Fortunately, at least 22 Republicans decided to stand on principle and vote against the latest ‘debt deal’ which is no deal at all. The simple matter is reflected in the statements of these 22 lawmakers. To summarize, spending and borrowing must be reduced to balance budgets and eventually produce a surplus in order to retire our nation’s staggering debt of trillions and unfunded mandates of many more trillions of dollars.

Government hsa been living on a credit card. Rather than stopping out of control spending the government has done what no individual can do. That is, they raise their own credit limit each time it is reached. This only produces an inevitable collapse when the point is reached that no one will lend America any more money. It really is that simple.

There is no debt deal in Washington that solves this problem. Again, we are lucky to have at least 22 Republicans who voted against this latest deal. The only reason liberals voted against it is they want nothing done but to continue tax and spend.

It is most likely that Boehner and Reid will cobble together a ‘deal’ that will do nothing to solve the problem and our nation will continue to head toward financial collapse like the EU and all socialists will be happy. Ain’t that wonderful (NOT).

Stanford Matthews
MoreWhat.com

Rep Jeff Duncan Votes Against the Budget Control Act of 2011

Congressman Jeff Duncan Issues Statement on Budget Control Act
Jul 29, 2011

Washington, DC—Freshman Congressman Jeff Duncan released the following statement regarding the passage of the Speaker’s debt limit plan, the Budget Control Act:

“Throughout the debt ceiling debate, Washington asked for a deal while Americans wanted a solution. Today Washington got their deal.”

“While the Speaker’s plan is well intentioned, I believe we have to do more.  Paltry cuts and another commission won’t bring about the types of serious structural reforms needed to save the nation’s credit rating.  As a husband, father of three, and a former small business owner I understand the importance of compromise.  But, $14 trillion in debt, we’re at a point in our nation’s history where a compromise that doesn’t solve our debt crisis is simply dangerous.  Before we raise the debt ceiling we need to first enact revolutionary spending reforms like a balanced budget amendment to solve our nation’s debt crisis and turn deficits into surpluses.”

“I appreciate Speaker Boehner’s willingness to fight Washington’s spending addiction, and though I don’t support his approach, I understand why he took this step.”

“This week I’ve heard from hundreds of constituents who oppose raising the debt ceiling without first adopting significant spending reforms.  I apologize to my constituents for being unable to convince more lawmakers to join the cause of demanding permanent spending reform.  Even though I’ve only been in Congress for seven months, I can already tell you that Washington will never voluntarily make significant cuts to spending.  That’s why we need to first pass a Balanced Budget Amendment that forces Washington to live within its means.”

Rep Scott DesJarlais Votes Against the Budget Control Act of 2011

Representative DesJarlais Votes Against Budget Control Act
Jul 29, 2011

Washington, D.C. –Representative Scott DesJarlais (TN-04) issued the following statement after voting against the Budget Control Act:

“After careful consideration, I ultimately decided that I could not vote in favor of the Budget Control Act.

“I was elected to Congress to address the substantial fiscal challenges that face our nation. Our federal government has buried us under a mountain of job-crushingdebt that is threatening our future.

“For too long Washington has been kicking this problem down the road. We have now come to the point where we are out of road.

“If we want to create jobs and boost our economy, we have to address our spending and debt now. That means both substantial and immediate cuts.

“I’m terribly disappointed by the actions of President Obama and Senate Democrats. Rather than being partners with us in cutting spending, they have chosen to block any attempt by House Republicans to enact crucial spending reductions that will get our fiscal house in order.

“Clearly, we cannot continue business as usual and it is now time for President Obama and Senate Democrats to come to that realization.”